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Quality Measures

Core Measure Results

1---Quality-Measures-(chart)---Acute-Myocardial-Infarction

A heart attack (also called AMI or acute myocardial infarction) happens when the arteries leading to the heart become blocked and the blood supply is slowed or stopped. These measures show some of the process of care provided, if appropriate for most adults who have had a heart attack. These measure include: Aspirin on arrival and at discharge, smoking cessation education, timeliness of medications that help the heart pump blood throughout the body.

2---Quality-Measures-(graph)---Acute-Myocardial-Infarction

The bar graph above represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance in all categories of publicly reported Acute Myocardial Infarction data. The first bar graph represents the average performance for all reporting hospitals in the United States, known as the “National Average”. The middle (second) bar graph represents the average performance for all reporting hospitals in the State of Utah, known as the “Utah Average”. The last bar graph represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance, in comparison to the National and State average. Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance is above the National and State average (the higher percentage the better).

3---Quality-Measures-(chart)---Heart-Failure

Heart Failure is a weakening of the heart’s pumping power. With heart failure, your body doesn’t get enough oxygen and nutrients to meet its needs. These measures show some of the process of care provided for most adults with heart failure. These measure include: documentation by the physician that evaluates the patient’s ability to pump blood through the heart, smoking cessation education, medications prescribed at time of discharge to help the heart pump blood throughout the body.

4---Quality-Measures-(graph)---Heart-Failure

The bar graph above represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance in all categories of publicly reported Heart Failure data. The first bar graph represents the average performance for all reporting hospitals in the United States, known as the “National Average”. The middle (second) bar graph represents the average performance for all reporting hospitals in the State of Utah, known as the “Utah Average”. The last bar graph represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance, in comparison to the National and State average.

5---Quality-Measures-(chart)---Pneumonia

Pneumonia is a serious lung infection that causes difficulty breathing, fever, cough and fatigue. These measures show some of the recommended treatments for pneumonia. These measure include: obtaining blood cultures drawn in the Emergency Department prior to the first antibiotic being given to the patient, ensuring the first antibiotic is given within 6 hours of arrival to the hospital, appropriate antibiotic selection, smoking cessation education, and assessing the need for vaccinations related to pneumococcal and influenza.

The bar graph above represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance in all categories of publicly reported Pneumonia data. The first bar graph represents the average performance for all reporting hospitals in the United States, known as the “National Average”. The middle (second) bar graph represents the average performance for all reporting hospitals in the State of Utah, known as the “Utah Average”. The last bar graph represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance, in comparison to the National and State average. Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance is above the National and State average (the higher percentage the better).

Hospitals can reduce the risk of infection after surgery by making sure they provide care that’s known to get the best results for most patients. Here are some examples:

  • Giving the recommended antibiotics at the right time before surgery
  • Stopping the antibiotics within the right timeframe after surgery
  • Maintaining the patient’s temperature and blood glucose (sugar) at normal levels
  • Removing catheters that are used to drain the bladder in a timely manner after surgery.

Hospitals can also reduce the risk of cardiac problems associated with surgery by:

  • Making sure that certain prescription drugs are continued in the time before, during, and just after the surgery. This includes drugs used to control heart rhythms and blood pressure.
  • Giving drugs that prevent blood clots and using other methods such as special stockings that increase circulation in the legs.

8---Quality-Measures-(graph)---Surgical-Infection-Prevention

The bar graph above represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance in all categories of publicly reported Surgical Infection Prevention data. The first bar graph represents the average performance for all reporting hospitals in the United States, known as the “National Average”. The middle (second) bar graph represents the average performance for all reporting hospitals in the State of Utah, known as the “Utah Average”. The last bar graph represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance, in comparison to the National and State average. Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance is performing above the National average and the State average (the higher percentage the better).

Outcome of Care Measures Results

One way to tell whether a hospital is doing a good job is to find out whether patients admitted to the hospital have death (mortality) rates that are lower (better) than the U.S. National Rate, about the same as the U.S. National Rate, or higher (worse) than the U.S. National Rate, given how sick they were when they were admitted to the hospital. “30-Day Mortality” is when patients die within 30 days of their admission to a hospital. Below, the death rates for each hospital are compared to the U.S. National Rate. The rates take into account how sick patients were before they were admitted to the hospital.

“30-Day Readmission” is when patients who have had a recent hospital stay need to go back into a hospital again within 30 days of their discharge. Below, the rates of readmission for each hospital are compared to the U.S. National Rate. The rates take into account how sick patients were before they were admitted to the hospital.

9---Care-Measures-Chart

Source Data: www.hospitalcompare.hhs.gov
Footnote 1: The “National Average” is an aggregate percentage calculated by averaging the percent compliance for each indicator, in each Core Measure category, as posted on the source data page.
Footnote 2: The “Utah Average” is an aggregate percentage calculated by averaging the percent compliance for each indicator, in each Core Measure category, as posted on the source data page.
Footnote 3: The “Davis Hospital” average is an aggregate percentage calculated using the numerator and denominator for each indicator, in each Core Measure category, as posted on the source data page.
Footnote 4: The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) aggregate percentage for the National, State and Davis Hospital averages does not include SCIP-Inf-4 Cardiac Surgery Patients, since Davis Hospital does not perform open heart procedures.

Exterior shot of the Entrance to Davis Hospital & Medical Center

1600 West Antelope Drive
Layton, Utah 84041

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1600 West Antelope Drive | Layton, UT 84041
(801) 807-1000

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