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Infection Prevention

What is Davis Hospital and Medical Center doing to prevent infections?

Davis Hospital and Medical Center has an Infection Prevention program designed to improve the quality of health care through the practice and management of infection prevention, education, and research. The Infection Prevention team collects data on hospital acquired infections and analyzes the data to identify patterns and trends. Infection rates are shared and discussed with physician and nursing colleagues in an effort to identify and implement best practices to reduce the risks for infection.

Like many hospitals, part of Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s Infection Prevention program includes tracking those infections that are “community acquired” versus “healthcare associated/acquired”. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines a healthcare-associated infection as, “infections that patients acquire during the course of receiving treatment for other conditions within a healthcare setting.” A “community acquired” infection is something that the patient has when he/she presents to the hospital for treatment or services. Why is it important to distinguish between the two? First, it helps the hospital identify those infections that we can have a direct impact on trying to prevent. Prevention starts with implementing evidenced-based practices, such as screenings on admission and “bundles” that help the healthcare team remember the correct processes to follow to prevent the spread of infection.

Hand Hygiene

Hand hygiene is the best means of preventing the spread of infection. Hand hygiene includes washing with soap and water or using alcohol hand sanitizer before and after each patient contact.

Davis Hospital and Medical Center has taken an active approach to improving the hand hygiene practices of its health care workers. A hand hygiene team was developed with representatives from major care groups, to provide comprehensive communication with an educational campaign to promote proper hand hygiene techniques. The Team members are designated as hand hygiene “champions,” whom are leaders that encourage compliance and educate their peers on proper technique.

An example of Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s aggressive hand hygiene efforts is the placement of alcohol hand sanitizers in public areas throughout the hospital including hallways, elevators and cafeterias, making them readily accessible to staff, patients, families, and visitors.

Surgical Site Infections – Cesarean Sections (C-Sections)

10---Infection-Prevention-(chart)---Cesarean-Sections

Hospitals can reduce the risk of infection after surgery by making sure they provide care that is known to get the best results for most patients. Here are some examples:

  • Giving the recommended antibiotics at the right time before surgery
  • Stopping the antibiotics within the right time frame after surgery
  • Maintaining the patient’s temperature and blood glucose (sugar at normal levels)
  • Removing catheters that are used to drain the bladder in a timely manner after surgery

How are We doing?

The graph below presents the total number of surgical site infections for Cesarean Sections, based upon the number of Cesarean Sections performed annually. Davis Hospital and Medical Center actively pursues excellence in patient safety, education and care through the patients hospital experience.

Davis Hospital and Medical Center tracks and trends surgical site infection rates for all surgical cases, and we compare our performance to national rates published by the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). The trend line in the graph below show the declining rate of our Cesarean Section surgical site infections at Davis Hospital.

11---Infection-Prevention-(graph)---Cesarean-Sections

The bar graph above represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance data, related to Cesarean Section Surgical Site Infections. The goal is to have zero surgical site Infections. Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance is trending towards zero.

Hospital Acquired Clostridium difficile (C. diff)

Clostridium difficile (C.diff) is a bacterial infection that causes diarrhea and more serious intestinal conditions, such as colitis (inflammation of the colon). People who develop a C. diff infection are usually taking antibiotics for another infection. Clostridium difficile bacteria may be found in the intestines or feces (bowel movements) of an infected person. People can become infected if they touch items or surfaces that are contaminated with the bacteria and then touch their mouth or open areas on their skin.

12---Infection-Prevention-(chart)---Clostridium-difficile

How are we doing?

This score tells you the number of Clostridium difficile (C.diff) infections per 1,000 patient days (total number of days spent by all adult patients in the hospital). Only infections identified by the hospital laboratory that developed on or after day 2 (48 hours) of hospital admission are included.

Lower numbers are better. Currently there is no national benchmark or target for new cases per 1,000 patient days, so we compare ourselves to the previous month/quarter performance. The data presented below is for calendar year 2010.

13---Infection-Prevention-(line-&-bar-graph)---Clostridium-difficile

The bar graph above represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance data, related to hospital acquired Clostridium difficile. The goal is to have zero hospital acquired Clostridium difficile infections. Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance is trending towards zero.

Hospital Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Blood Stream Infections

14---Infection-Prevention-(chart)---MRSA-Blood-Stream-Infections

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is caused by a strain of staph bacteria that’s become resistant to the antibiotics commonly used to treat ordinary staph infections.

MRSA is resistant to antibiotics including methicillin, oxacillin, penicillin, and amoxicillin. Since these strong drugs are not effective with MRSA, these infections are sometimes called Multidrug-Resistant Organisms (MDROs). Staph infections, including MRSA, occur most often among people in hospitals and healthcare facilities (such as nursing homes and dialysis centers) who have weakened immune systems. The infection can be spread by skin-to-skin contact, sharing or touching a personal item with someone with infected skin, or touching a surface or item that has been in contact with someone with MRSA.

How Are We Doing?

This graph represents the number of community acquired versus hospital acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) cases. Only infections identified by the hospital laboratory that developed on or after day 2 (48 hours) of hospital admission are considered as “hospital acquired.”

Lower numbers are better. Currently there is no national benchmark or target for new cases per 1,000 patient days, so we compare ourselves to the previous month/quarter performance. The data presented below is for calendar year 2010.

15---Infection-Prevention-(line-graph)---Community-vs-Hospital-Acquired-MRSA-Cases

The line graph above represents Davis Hospital and Medical Center’s performance data, related to the number of identified cases of hospital acquired MRSA. The goal is to have zero hospital acquired MRSA cases.

What can you do to help prevent the spread of infection?

Patients and their families can help protect themselves from hospital-acquired infections by being vigilant. Be active in your care!

Before you let anyone touch you, or a family member that is a patient, ask them whether they have washed their hands. Don’t be shy about it; it’s your health.

Exterior shot of the Entrance to Davis Hospital & Medical Center

1600 West Antelope Drive
Layton, Utah 84041

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1600 West Antelope Drive | Layton, UT 84041
(801) 807-1000

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